Documentary History Project for Youth Vol. 10 - "The Movement: The Story of Philadelphia’s Settlement Houses"

Produced by: 
2007 Documentary History Project for Youth
Year: 
2007
Duration: 
00:31:33

Documentary History Project for Youth Price:

Higher Education Institutions & Government Agency DVD | $139.00
K-12 & Public Libraries DVD | $79.00
Home Video DVD License – Restrictions Apply | $20.00

 

 


Scribe Video Center Program:

The Documentary History Project for Youth (DHPY) is an annual after-school, weekend and summertime digital media production workshop for middle and high school students. Each year, youth participants create short documentary films as a way to explore some aspect of the social, political and cultural history of Philadelphia. 

 


DHPY Students: Ashura Abdul-Basit (Homeschooled), Shaquan Bagby (Bodine High School for International Affairs), Annjeannette Daniels (Roxborough High School), Jackson Fongsouvan (Central High School), Nydrea Gause (New Media Technology Charter), Alex Ljachin (Franklin Learning Center), Matthew Palmer (Central High School), Sophavoeun Phuong (Bok High School / CCP-ATC), Anthony Shah (Penn Wood High School)

 


Instructors: Deborah Rudman and Jamese Wells

 


Film Summary:

What is a Settlement House? Join with the filmmakers as they learn about the history of the Settlement House Movement from its beginnings in London in the 1800s to its arrival in Philadelphia and up to present day. These institutions provided food, education, culture, and political clout for new immigrants and disenfranchised residents. Local settlement house leaders and participants from The Lighthouse, Lutheran Settlement House, Southwark House, Houston Center, Germantown Settlement, Settlement Music School and Friends Neighborhood Guild share their experiences and reflect on how their work has changed and evolved over time. Through archival photographs, personal stories and behind the scenes looks at the production discover how the settlement movement helped shape our nation by focusing on the unique needs of communities and neighborhoods that define our large cities.