students

Princeton Nursery School : A Jewel For The Neighborhood, The

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

Produced by Princeton Nursery School & Scribe Video Center

Filmmaker Facilitator: 

Charlene Gilbert, Carlton Jones, Louis Massiah

Year released: 
1997
Length: 
12 minutes
Price: 

$20 for individuals / $35 for Community Institutions ie: libraries, schools, non-profits / $50 for Universities & Businesses

Buy this Video: 

To purchase a DVD please call 215 222 4201 or email inquiry@scribe.org.

Princeton Nursery School's mission is to provide a happy atmosphere for children at an affordable cost for their parents. Many of the school's parents are working, going to school, single -- or all three! The video chronicles the nursery school's history, as well as its daily routine and problems, including the recurring struggle to get loving but time-crunched parents to become -- and stay -- more involved.

Filmmaker's Name: 
Charlene Gilbert, Carlton Jones, Louis Massiah
Filmmaker's Bio: 

The Princeton Nursery School was founded in 1929 to respond to the needs of local mothers looking to place their children in a caring and educational environment while they worked outside the home. Children at the Princeton Nursery School experience diversity and daily successes, develop healthy attitudes toward mistakes, assume responsibility for their personal space and materials, and encounter decision-making opportunities in the planning of their independent activities.

Charlene Gilbert is an independent documentary film and videomaker whose award winning film, Homecoming, Sometimes I am haunted by memories of red dirt and clay, premiered nationally on PBS and won the NBPC Prized Pieces Award for Best Documentary. Ms. Gilbert also co-authored, with Quinn Eli, a companion book to the film entitled Homecoming: The Story of African American Farmers published by Beacon Press. Her most recent documentary, Children Will Listen, premiered at the 2004 AFI Silverdocs Documentary Festival and had its national primetime PBS broadcast premiere in the fall of 2005. Her films and videos have been screened in numerous international and national festivals including: FESPACO, the Athens International Film and Video Festival and the Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema. Ms. Gilbert is also the recipient of several awards and fellowships including the Rockefeller Media Fellowship and the Kellogg National Leadership Fellowship award. She is currently working on a documentary project on Juvenile Justice and resides in Washington, DC where she is an associate professor in the School of Communication at American University.

Carlton Jones is a working videographer, a frequent Scribe video faciliator, and the head of Willow Grove, PA-based Carlton Jones Video.

Louis Massiah is the founder and executive director of Scribe. He also produced and directed the documentary works Louise Thompson Patterson: In Her Own Words, and W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography in Four Voices. His award-winning works have been seen widely on public television and at international film festival and include Cecil B. Moore, an examination of the political leader and the Civil Rights struggle in Philadelphia, and A is for Anarchist, B is for Brown, on young political activists that emerged from a Hewlett video workshop at Haverford College.

Massiah's works for public television include Power! and A Nation of Law? for the award-winning series Eyes on the Prize II; <\em>Trash!, an encyclopedic look at trash as aspect of American culture; My Own Boss, exploring worker-owned and self-managed industries; and Digging Dinosaurs, profile of paleontologist, Jack Horner. In 2000, he served as senior production consultant for Robert Pinksy's Favorite Poem Project on the PBS' News Hour with Jim Lehrer. His current project, Haytian Stories, examines the complex relationship between the United States and Haiti over the last 200 years.

Public Screenings, Broadcasts and Festivals: 

February 13, 1998 - Scribe Video Center Retrospective: Five on the Black Hand Side, Painted Bride Art Center (Philadelphia, PA)

How Our Garden Grows: A Portrait of the After-School Program at St. Gabriels

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

The After School Program at St. Gabriel's & Scribe Video Center

Filmmaker Facilitator: 

Lise Yasui & Cindy Burstein,

Year released: 
1997
Length: 
11 minutes
Price: 

$20 for individuals / $35 for Community Institutions ie: libraries, schools, non-profits / $50 for Universities & Businesses

Buy this Video: 

To purchase a DVD please call 215 222 4201 or email inquiry@scribe.org.

The After School Program in Olney works with community organizations and artists to create an environment that addresses the multiple ways children and their families need support. The imaginative video documents how the artists and teachers, through various art, music and dance projects, nurture the development of children and offer essential ingredients of their "growing garden."

Filmmaker's Name: 
Cindy Burstein,Lise yasui & Urban Bridges atSt. Gabriels
Filmmaker's Bio: 

Founded in 1990, Urban Bridges at St. Gabrielís "[provides] nurturing educational opportunities for people of all ages in the creative arts, computer technology and literacy." The program is located in the Olney-Feltonville section of Philadelphia, and provides after-school programs focusing on literacy, the visual and performing arts, and technology, for approximately 352 children.

Lise Yasui is a filmmaker and producer based in Philadelphia. She served on the board of the National Asian American Telecommunications Association, and serves as a consulting producer on independent documentary projects with the Long Bow Group of Boston. Yasui has worked extensively in the nonprofit funding arena and as a curator and educator with a special interest in multicultural media. In 1988, she was nomintaed for an Academy Award in the Best Documentary Short Subject for her film "American Experience: A Family Gathering." She was also a producer of 1995's "The Gate of Heavenly Peace" and the coordinating producer of 2003's "A Morning Sun."

Cindy Burstein is a documentary producer living and working in Philadelphia. She comes to the field with a background in community organizing and youth leadership development. Since receiving her MFA in 1997 from Rutgers University-Mason Gross School of the Arts, she has been teaching video production, producing documentaries, and collaborating with other filmmakers. Her most recent film, "Passionate Voices: American Jews and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict" was created as a tool for dialogue. She served as regional outreach coordinator of theatrical release for New Yorker Films award-winning documentaries, Trembling Before G-d and My Architect. As an adjunct professor in the Film and Media Arts Department at Temple University, she continues to enlighten students about the merits of progressive media.

Out Of Time : A History Of Public School Education In Philadelphia

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

Produced by student videomakers in Scribe Video Center’s 2003 Documentary History Project for Youth

Year released: 
2004
Length: 
30 minutes

The 2004 Documentary History Project for Youth students worked diligently to span three centuries of history exploring the evolution of public education in Philadelphia. From early private Quaker establishments to the birth of the common school system a century later, right up to today's charter schools and the present-day schools contracted to the often controversial Edison Schools Inc., Philadelphia's eyebrow-raising educational periods are presented with humor and insight, all under the umbrella of the video's time traveling protagonist.

Public Screenings, Broadcasts and Festivals: 

February 14, 2004 - Part of Art Sanctuary's Celebration of Black Writing, Community College of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA)
May 27, 2004 - Part of Reelblack Presents The Youth Media Intramurals at the 5th Annual Youth Media Jam, Prince Music Theater (Philadelphia, PA)

Montessori Genesis II : A Family Thing

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

Produced by Montessori Genesis School & Scribe Video Center

Filmmaker Facilitator: 

Nadine Patterson

Year released: 
1991
Length: 
8 minutes
Price: 

$20 for individuals / $35 for Community Institutions ie: libraries, schools, non-profits / $50 for Universities & Businesses

Buy this Video: 

To purchase a DVD please call 215 222 4201 or email inquiry@scribe.org.

Unhappy with your child's schooling? Don't call the principal; start your own school. That's what a group of low-income African-American families from the Mantua community decided to do 30 years ago, and as this short video testifies, the results have been astounding.

Filmmaker's Name: 
Montessori Genesis II
Filmmaker's Bio: 

Montessori Genesis II (MGII) was founded in 1976 by sixteen low-income Black families. The children of these families had had a very successful Montessori pre-school experience at the Early Learning Center in the Mantua section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. These parents wanted their children to continue enjoying a high quality education during their elementary years. But there was no nearby elementary school prepared to follow up on the Montessori education that had been so successful.

The group of sixteen families joined together to take on this challenge. They solicited the help of two Religious of the Assumption nuns who were trained Montessori teachers to instruct their children and started their own school, Montessori Genesis II. Serving as something of a magnet, Montessori Genesis II now draws students not only from the surrounding community, but from throughout the Philadelphia area such as North Philadelphia, Germantown, Greater Northwest Philly and beyond. The quality of the education and personal growth afforded the students at MGII is such that when they leave, they can go out and successfully navigate the waters of all levels of higher education and post-academic life.

Press: 

August 7, 1997 - "Hey, That's Me!," by David Warner, Philadelphia City Paper
August 8, 1999 - "New Program Takes Films Out Of Theaters and Into the Streets," by Daniel Rubin, Philadelphia Inquirer

Public Screenings, Broadcasts and Festivals: 

August 1997 - Street Movies screening at Montessori Genesis II playground (Philadelphia, PA)
August 1999 - Street Movies screening at Montessori Genesis II playground (Philadelphia, PA)

I Used To Teach English

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

Documentary Videomakers: Nadine Patterson and Margie Strosser; Executive produced and commissioned by the Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation

Year released: 
1993
Length: 
20 minutes
Price: 

$20 for individuals / $35 for Community Institutions ie: libraries, schools, non-profits / $50 for Universities & Businesses

Buy this Video: 

To purchase a DVD please call 215 222 4201 or email inquiry@scribe.org.

Marsha Pincus conducts English classes at Simon Gratz High School, a culturally diverse public school in gritty North Philadelphia. Pincus, always on the hunt for more effective ways to teach, is able to engage and motivate students through student-centered teaching using dialogue and playwriting. Her students, thrilled at her overt invitation to bring the whole range of their lives and cultures into the classroom, explain how the classes have helped them become more articulate, persuasive, and deeply interested in both playwriting and playing with words.

Filmmaker's Name: 
Nadine Patterson & Margie Strosser
Filmmaker's Bio: 

Philadelphia-based independent producer Nadine Patterson has been making independent film/video for the past twenty years. She has produced and directed programs for the School District of Philadelphia's cable station, and WYBE Public Television. She earned her MA in Filmmaking at the London Film School. Previous work includes Shizue , a Scribe Video production that was screened at the Museum of Modern Art, NY; and Moving with the Dreaming, winner of a Prized Pieces Award from the National Black Programming Consortium. A recipient of a Media Arts Fellowship from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, her award-winning work has often been broadcast on public television.

Margie Strosser is an award-winning producer, director and writer in television and film whose projects include the autobiographical documentary Rape Stories, and fictional works such as Strange Weather and Moon Juice. Recently, Margie was the senior producer/writer for three seasons of Birth Day, the Discovery Health Channel's highest rated daytime show. She and writing partner Cate Wilson are currently collaborating on a romantic comedy and a psychological thriller adapted from a British novel.

Awards: 

Winner, Golden Apple Award, National Educational Media Network

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