parents

Shizue

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

Directed by Emiko Tonooka, Edited by Nadine Patterson

Year released: 
1991
Length: 
17 minutes
Price: 

$20 for individuals / $35 for Community Institutions ie: libraries, schools, non-profits / $50 for Universities & Businesses

Buy this Video: 

To purchase a DVD please call 215 222 4201 or email inquiry@scribe.org.

Emiko Tonooka, a Nisei American woman, traveled to Japan in 1986 to find her unknown half-sister, Shizue. Through storytelling, photography and carefully choreographed video work, a powerful portrait of family emerges when Tonooka's narrative crosses the chasm of time, culture and continents to bear witness as the two siblings attempt to recover their lost histories.

Filmmaker's Name: 
Emiko Tonooka
Filmmaker's Bio: 

Emiko Tonooka, a Nisei (second generation) Japanese-American woman, is a former teacher longtime community activist who lives in Philadelphia. After Pearl Harbor was bombed in 1942, Emiko was one of the 110,000 Americans who were forced from their homes into internment camps, where they were incarcerated for the war's duration. Her renowned 1978 video, Emi, documents her effort to reclaim another part of her past as she makes a pilgrimage to the place of her wartime internment -- Manzanar, California.

Public Screenings, Broadcasts and Festivals: 

Museum of Modern Art (New York, NY) [details not found]

Shelter Stories

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

Produced by Meryl Perlson

Year released: 
1990
Length: 
14:30 minutes
Price: 

$20 for individuals / $35 for Community Institutions ie: libraries, schools, non-profits / $50 for Universities & Businesses

Buy this Video: 

To purchase a DVD please call 215 222 4201 or email inquiry@scribe.org.

Told from the perspective of five homeless teenagers living with their families in shelters, the video examines some of the causes of homelessness and debunks many of the common myths about who is homeless and why. The quintet is eager to demystify shelter conditions, the effects of homelessness on family and academic life, and their growing awareness of how media and society deal -- or don't deal -- with their homelessness.

Filmmaker's Name: 
Meryl Perlson
Filmmaker's Bio: 

Perlson began making documentary and experimental video in Philadelphia in the late 1980's. She is a founding member of the Termite TV Collective, an ongoing swarm devoted to the creation of alternative media. Her award-winning collective and individual work has been broadcast on PBS and cable, exhibited nationally in museums including MOMA (NYC) and the New Museum, and shown at a wide range of festivals. She has an MFA in Film/Media Arts from Temple University, and has taught at the university level for the past decade. She is currently a mother/artist in Medford, MA, where her life sequences between family, community, art and teaching is always subject to interruption.

Public Screenings, Broadcasts and Festivals: 

March 10, 1991 - "Panel: The Aesthetics of Community-Based Video," Women in the Directors Chair Film & Video Festival (Chicago, IL)

Princeton Nursery School : A Jewel For The Neighborhood, The

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

Produced by Princeton Nursery School & Scribe Video Center

Filmmaker Facilitator: 

Charlene Gilbert, Carlton Jones, Louis Massiah

Year released: 
1997
Length: 
12 minutes
Price: 

$20 for individuals / $35 for Community Institutions ie: libraries, schools, non-profits / $50 for Universities & Businesses

Buy this Video: 

To purchase a DVD please call 215 222 4201 or email inquiry@scribe.org.

Princeton Nursery School's mission is to provide a happy atmosphere for children at an affordable cost for their parents. Many of the school's parents are working, going to school, single -- or all three! The video chronicles the nursery school's history, as well as its daily routine and problems, including the recurring struggle to get loving but time-crunched parents to become -- and stay -- more involved.

Filmmaker's Name: 
Charlene Gilbert, Carlton Jones, Louis Massiah
Filmmaker's Bio: 

The Princeton Nursery School was founded in 1929 to respond to the needs of local mothers looking to place their children in a caring and educational environment while they worked outside the home. Children at the Princeton Nursery School experience diversity and daily successes, develop healthy attitudes toward mistakes, assume responsibility for their personal space and materials, and encounter decision-making opportunities in the planning of their independent activities.

Charlene Gilbert is an independent documentary film and videomaker whose award winning film, Homecoming, Sometimes I am haunted by memories of red dirt and clay, premiered nationally on PBS and won the NBPC Prized Pieces Award for Best Documentary. Ms. Gilbert also co-authored, with Quinn Eli, a companion book to the film entitled Homecoming: The Story of African American Farmers published by Beacon Press. Her most recent documentary, Children Will Listen, premiered at the 2004 AFI Silverdocs Documentary Festival and had its national primetime PBS broadcast premiere in the fall of 2005. Her films and videos have been screened in numerous international and national festivals including: FESPACO, the Athens International Film and Video Festival and the Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema. Ms. Gilbert is also the recipient of several awards and fellowships including the Rockefeller Media Fellowship and the Kellogg National Leadership Fellowship award. She is currently working on a documentary project on Juvenile Justice and resides in Washington, DC where she is an associate professor in the School of Communication at American University.

Carlton Jones is a working videographer, a frequent Scribe video faciliator, and the head of Willow Grove, PA-based Carlton Jones Video.

Louis Massiah is the founder and executive director of Scribe. He also produced and directed the documentary works Louise Thompson Patterson: In Her Own Words, and W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography in Four Voices. His award-winning works have been seen widely on public television and at international film festival and include Cecil B. Moore, an examination of the political leader and the Civil Rights struggle in Philadelphia, and A is for Anarchist, B is for Brown, on young political activists that emerged from a Hewlett video workshop at Haverford College.

Massiah's works for public television include Power! and A Nation of Law? for the award-winning series Eyes on the Prize II; <\em>Trash!, an encyclopedic look at trash as aspect of American culture; My Own Boss, exploring worker-owned and self-managed industries; and Digging Dinosaurs, profile of paleontologist, Jack Horner. In 2000, he served as senior production consultant for Robert Pinksy's Favorite Poem Project on the PBS' News Hour with Jim Lehrer. His current project, Haytian Stories, examines the complex relationship between the United States and Haiti over the last 200 years.

Public Screenings, Broadcasts and Festivals: 

February 13, 1998 - Scribe Video Center Retrospective: Five on the Black Hand Side, Painted Bride Art Center (Philadelphia, PA)

Peace In The Goodlands

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 
Year released: 
2003
Length: 
14 minutes

"The only time it seems we make the news is when something goes bad. Every time something goes bad, they'll have a sound truck out here filming. When do they ever show the good in our community? This is my home. You don't have the right to call it the Badlands. I live here."
- A frustrated young resident of "The Goodlands"

Centro Nueva Creacion's video honors residents of Philadelphia's West Kensington neighborhood who are redefining their community as a place of peace.

Filmmaker's Name: 
Centro Nueva Creation
Filmmaker's Bio: 

Centro Nueva Creation's mission is to transform their neighborhood by working with youth and families to create a better community. They believe that the assets of West Kensington outweigh the problems and that the area's youth and families have incredible resources for change. Although our community is often called "The Badlands" by the media, they like to promote it as "The Goodlands," a name more reflective of its current reality as a place where dramatic change is possible.

Press: 

December 9, 2004 - "Scribe Video Center's Street Movies Undercover at Graterford Prison," Greater Philadelphia Film Office Web site (brief mention)

Public Screenings, Broadcasts and Festivals: 

February 2004 & 2005 - Gloria Dei Lutheran Church (Philadelphia, PA)
May 2004 - Southeastern PA Synod's Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Assembly
June 2004 - Centro Nueva Creacion 10th Anniversary Celebration (Philadelphia, PA)
Spring 2004 - Winona Cotter High School in Minnesota as part of unit on community
June 8, July 6 and August 10, 2004 - DUTV Cable 57 (Philadelphia, PA)
July 20, 2004 - WYBE TV-35's Philadelphia Stories (Philadelphia, PA)
August 5, 2004 - Street Movies screening at Sturgis Playground (Philadelphia, PA)
August 7, 2004 - Street Movies screening at Eagles Park (Philadelphia, PA)
December 10, 2004 - Centro Nueva Creacion's Festival de la Luz en el Barrio (Philadelphia, PA)
September 10, 2005 - Hala Cine Latino Film Festival at the Civic Theatre (Allentown, PA)

How Our Garden Grows: A Portrait of the After-School Program at St. Gabriels

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

The After School Program at St. Gabriel's & Scribe Video Center

Filmmaker Facilitator: 

Lise Yasui & Cindy Burstein,

Year released: 
1997
Length: 
11 minutes
Price: 

$20 for individuals / $35 for Community Institutions ie: libraries, schools, non-profits / $50 for Universities & Businesses

Buy this Video: 

To purchase a DVD please call 215 222 4201 or email inquiry@scribe.org.

The After School Program in Olney works with community organizations and artists to create an environment that addresses the multiple ways children and their families need support. The imaginative video documents how the artists and teachers, through various art, music and dance projects, nurture the development of children and offer essential ingredients of their "growing garden."

Filmmaker's Name: 
Cindy Burstein,Lise yasui & Urban Bridges atSt. Gabriels
Filmmaker's Bio: 

Founded in 1990, Urban Bridges at St. Gabrielís "[provides] nurturing educational opportunities for people of all ages in the creative arts, computer technology and literacy." The program is located in the Olney-Feltonville section of Philadelphia, and provides after-school programs focusing on literacy, the visual and performing arts, and technology, for approximately 352 children.

Lise Yasui is a filmmaker and producer based in Philadelphia. She served on the board of the National Asian American Telecommunications Association, and serves as a consulting producer on independent documentary projects with the Long Bow Group of Boston. Yasui has worked extensively in the nonprofit funding arena and as a curator and educator with a special interest in multicultural media. In 1988, she was nomintaed for an Academy Award in the Best Documentary Short Subject for her film "American Experience: A Family Gathering." She was also a producer of 1995's "The Gate of Heavenly Peace" and the coordinating producer of 2003's "A Morning Sun."

Cindy Burstein is a documentary producer living and working in Philadelphia. She comes to the field with a background in community organizing and youth leadership development. Since receiving her MFA in 1997 from Rutgers University-Mason Gross School of the Arts, she has been teaching video production, producing documentaries, and collaborating with other filmmakers. Her most recent film, "Passionate Voices: American Jews and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict" was created as a tool for dialogue. She served as regional outreach coordinator of theatrical release for New Yorker Films award-winning documentaries, Trembling Before G-d and My Architect. As an adjunct professor in the Film and Media Arts Department at Temple University, she continues to enlighten students about the merits of progressive media.

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